Kate Arrington

Research
My research interests focus on the cognitive control, attention, and working memory processes engaged during volitional multitask behavior. I would characterize my research approach as analytical cognitive neuroscience in which behavioral and neural data are used in conjunction with modeling to address theories of cognitive function. 

Selected Publications

Weaver, S. M., & Arrington, C. M. (In press). The effect of hierarchical task representations on task selection in voluntary task switching.  Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition.

Demanet, J., DeBaene, W., Arrington, C. M., & Brass, M. (2013). Biasing free choices: The role of the rostral cingulate zone in intentional control. Neuroimage, 72, 207-213.

Weaver, S. M., & Arrington, C. M. (2013). Tracking the multitasking mind. Zeitschrift für Psychologie, 221, 51-60.

Butler, K. M., Arrington, C. M., & Weywadt, C. (2011). Working memory capacity modulates task performance, but has little influence on task choice. Memory & Cognition, 39, 708-724.

Arrington, C. M., Weaver, S. M., & Pauker, R. L.* (2010). Stimulus-based priming in task choice during voluntary task switching. Journal of Experimental Psychology:  Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 36, 1060-1067.

Arrington, C. M., & Yates, M. M.* (2009). The role of attentional networks in voluntary task switching. Pyschonomic Bulletin & Review, 16, 660-665.

Arrington, C. M. (2008). The effect of stimulus availability on task choice in voluntary task switching. Memory & Cognition, 36, 991-997.

Arrington, C. M., Logan, G. D., & Schneider, D. W. (2007). Separating cue encoding from target processing in the explicit task-cuing procedure: Are there “true” task switch effects? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 33, 484-502.

Arrington, C. M., & Logan, G. D. (2005). Voluntary task switching: Chasing the elusive homunculus. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 31, 683-702.

Arrington, C. M., & Logan, G. D. (2004).  The cost of a voluntary task switch. Psychological Science, 15, 610-615.

 

Lehigh University Psychology - Arrington
Associate Professor
343 Chandler-Ullmann Hall
610-758-4230
Michigan State University, Ph.D 2002 Psychology
Wake Forest University, M.A. 1996 Psychology
Furman University, B.A./B.S. 1994 Psychology/Chemistry

Teaching Interests: 

Cognitive Psychology
Attention and Cognitive Control
Cognitive Neuroscience
Research Methods and Statistics